Education & Workforce | Page 11 | Business Roundtable

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What is Business Roundtable

Business Roundtable (BRT) is an association of chief executive officers of leading U.S. companies working to promote sound public policy and a thriving U.S. economy.

More Than Leaders. Leadership.

Business Roundtable is an association of chief executive officers of leading U.S. companies working to promote a thriving economy and expanded opportunity for all Americans through sound public policy.

About BRT

Business Roundtable supports policies that will support a world-class workforce equipped with the knowledge and skills needed to help America lead in global innovation, drive robust economic growth and foster job creation. We are committed to ensuring all students and workers are prepared to work and ready to succeed.

Recent Activities in Education & Workforce

July 17, 2015
Media Resource

This bipartisan approach can serve as an effective model for even more legislative successes in the future.

July 16, 2015
Letter

We are pleased that The Every Child Achieves Act, as passed by the Senate, makes important progress in each of these areas. We also appreciate the hard work that has gone into bringing this bipartisan legislation to the floor, and we look forward to closely working with you to ensure that ESEA is reauthorized as soon as possible.

July 14, 2015
Letter

Weakening these requirements would undermine accountability provisions designed to ensure that all children – no matter their background or school – receive the education they deserve.

July 10, 2015
Letter

Senate Amendment 2156 would ensure parents, educators and policymakers have access to publicly reported data on postsecondary enrollment and remediation rates for high school graduates, both overall and for categories of students.

July 9, 2015
Media Resource

The ESEA effectively ends the days of No Child Left Behind, but it doesn’t mean that the federal government has no role in ensuring our children receive the high-quality education they need to be productive citizens. The federal role should be limited, leaving K-12 education primarily up to state government, local schools districts and, of course, parents. But when the federal government is involved, it must make certain its policies hold schools accountable and require that tax dollars be spent wisely.

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Committee Spotlight

As business leaders representing every sector of the economy, Business Roundtable members know that the American economy thrives when U.S. workers have the levels of education and training needed to succeed...

Growth Agenda

A Growth Plan for the U.S.

Business leaders are committed to working with government to foster a healthy business climate that creates opportunity for everyone in the U.S. We have identified attainable targets that will produce real, sustainable growth for our country.

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