Smart Regulation | Page 12 | Business Roundtable

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What is Business Roundtable

Business Roundtable (BRT) is an association of chief executive officers of leading U.S. companies working to promote sound public policy and a thriving U.S. economy.

More Than Leaders. Leadership.

Business Roundtable is an association of chief executive officers of leading U.S. companies working to promote a thriving economy and expanded opportunity for all Americans through sound public policy.

About BRT

Nearly three-quarters of Business Roundtable CEOs list regulations as one of the top three cost pressures facing their businesses. In a recent survey, 82 percent of Business Roundtable members said that they find the U.S. regulatory system more burdensome than that of other developed countries. Fifty-six percent believe pending regulations will negatively affect their hiring and capital spending over the next two years. And 68 percent indicate that if existing regulatory costs were reduced by 20 percent, the money saved would be invested in increased research and development. These findings are alarming if we want a healthy, growing U.S. economy that provides economic opportunities for all.

Business Roundtable CEOs are not against regulation; rather they are strong advocates for a smarter regulatory system with greater clarity regarding the costs, benefits and cumulative burdens placed on America’s job creators. Regulations must be developed based on the best available science, the application of rigorous cost-benefit analysis, the establishment of realistic timetables and careful consideration of the burdens placed on business.

Business Roundtable CEOs believe that a smarter regulatory system and a modernized federal permitting process will help drive increased business investment, economic growth and job creation.

Top Regulations of Concern

Achieving Smarter Regulation

By improving the regulatory process, the resulting regulations will better meet the needs of the American people in a way that does not impose unnecessary costs. This report reaffirms time-tested recommendations and focuses on particular proposals that are most relevant today.

Civil justice reform, improving the jobs climate

BRT President John Engler moderated a discussion Wednesday at the 12th annual Legal Reform Summit sponsored by the U.S. Chamber's Institute for Legal Reform. The participants, including Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell, made it clear: Tort reform can improve business climates and job creation in the states.

Letter to Chairman Lamar S. Smith on H.R. 3010

On behalf of the Business Roundtable (BRT), an association of chief executive officers of leading U.S. companies, I want to thank you for holding a legislative hearing on H.R. 3010, the Regulatory Accountability Act, which you introduced. We ask that you include this letter in the hearing record.

Bringing accountability to regulation -- and regulators

The House Judiciary Committee held a hearing today on H.R. 3010, the Regulatory Accountability Act of 2010. Good goal -- accountability -- good legislation, good hearing.

No, regulation does matter

Almost as if in rebuttal to Treasury's new chief economist, Gallup today released a survey it headlines, "Gov't Regulations at Top of Small-Business Owners' Problem List."

Uncertainty? Uncertainty!

Jan Eberly, the U.S. Treasury's new assistant secretary for domestic economic policy, asserts: "[Two] commonly repeated misconceptions are that uncertainty created by proposed regulations is holding back business investment and hiring and that the overall burden of existing regulations is so high that firms have reduced their hiring." Others disagree.

An 'impressive' global recovery IS possible

Dave Cote, chairman CEO of Honeywell International Inc. and vice chairman of Business Roundtable, appeared on CNBC's Squawkbox this morning to discussion third quarter earnings and the state of the economy, current and upcoming. Although slow growth is most likely in 2012 and recession is possible, conditions exist that make an "impressive" economic recovery in 2012 possible, Cote said, IF governments get things right.

Jobs and Competitiveness Council, the interim report

The President's Council on Jobs and Competitiveness released its interim report to President Obama late Monday, "Taking Action, Building Confidence." The Business Roundtable found much to like in the document.

Anticipating the Jobs and Competitiveness Council's report

President Obama will travel to Pittsburgh Tuesday to view a union worker-training center and then accept the release of the preliminary report of the President's Council on Jobs and Competitiveness. We're expecting good things from the report.

When the regulators run government

Congress and President Obama have enacted 36 separate pieces of legislation into law so far in 2011. The Federal Register topped 60,000 pages for the year last week.

Pages

Committee Priorities

Business Roundtable conducted a survey of its members to identify regulations that are of most concern across all our business sectors. The majority of these regulations directly and negatively impact economic growth.

Read More
Business Roundtable supports a smarter, more modern approach to regulation that meets regulatory goals while also promoting innovation, economic growth and job creation. Read More
There is widespread, bipartisan agreement – from the President’s Jobs Council to the building trades unions – that improving the federal permitting process will help unlock investment, leading to economic growth and job creation. Read More